Smoke Bitten (Mercy Thompson #12)

Two in a row! It’s like Christmas! If Christmas was chuck full of creepy uberpowerful fae…

One of the major plot threads is dealing with the fallout of Storm Cursed . Mercy and co may have won the day, but in doing so they managed to tick off a great number of very powerful beings, lost a strong ally, and may have caused some permanent harm to Adam and Mercy’s relationship. I really hated this at first–I’ve loved how solid the relationships of the main characters are in these books, letting them deal with huge problems together–but by the end I’m at least willing to see where this goes.

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Storm Cursed (Mercy Thompson #11)

It’s been a while since my last re-read/listen through the Mercy Thompson books. I had forgotten just host much things had been changing on a larger world building scale in the last few books: since Mercy put herself and her pack on the line defending the people and territory of the Columbia Basin, things have gotten complicated. And dark. And did I mention complicated?

It’s fascinating world building.

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Fire Touched (Mercy Thompson #9)

In some ways, Fire Touched manages to back down from the scale of the previous two books. We’re no longer fighting primordial spirits or gods, but rather “just” the Fae. Of course, as we see through the course of the book, there are some Fae who might as well be gods.

On the other hand, this book as many as any that came before will really change the shape of the future of the universe that Briggs is building. In a nutshell, the wolves are going politically toe to toe with the Fae. Anything more than that would be even more a spoiler, but it’s still another interesting bit of worldbuilding.

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Silence Fallen (Mercy Thompson #10)

I last read (/ listened to) the Mercy Thompson books back in 2016, so I thought it was about time to go through the series (plus the Alpha and Omega books) again. Imagine my delight when I saw both series had a new entry!

“I’m a mechanic; I fix things that are broken. I turn into a thirty-five pound coyote. I have powerful friends. But when it comes right down to it, my real superpower is chaos."

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Fire Touched (Mercy Thompson #9)

In some ways, Fire Touched manages to back down from the scale of the previous two books. We’re no longer fighting primordial spirits or gods, but rather “just” the Fae. Of course, as we see through the course of the book, there are some Fae who might as well be gods.

On the other hand, this book as many as any that came before will really change the shape of the future of the universe that Briggs is building. In a nutshell, the wolves are going politically toe to toe with the Fae. Anything more than that would be even more a spoiler, but it’s still another interesting bit of worldbuilding.

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Night Broken (Mercy Thompson #8)

Interesting thing about tight first person point of view: when the main character feels strongly about another character, it comes through really strongly. Take for example Christy, Adam’s ex-wife. On one hand, I’m sure she’s not quite as bad as she appears, given that all we see is from Mercy’s point of view. On the other hand, she’s really a fairly troubled person.

On the supernatural scale, we actually manage to step up another level from the River Devil and Coyote and friends. This time around we get an ancient big bad from the Canary Islands who’s just as hard to kill as the River Devil but has even more firepower (heh) on their side. It’s a fascinating bit of mythology I’ve never come across anywhere else and manages to fit well enough into the current world.

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Frost Burned (Mercy Thompson #7)

Frost Burned feels almost like two novels sort of smooshed together. In starts out with something of a bang with the entire pack getting kidnapped by people apparently mad enough to take on an entire pack of werewolves at once. By the second half though, that’s shifted into a little bit of Fae and a lotta bit of vampire trouble which–don’t get me wrong–is related, but feels like a different sort of book.

It actually works surprisingly well though.

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River Marked (Mercy Thompson #6)

River Marked takes what we’ve seen in the previous 5 Mercy Thompson books and turns it somewhat on its head. Previously, we’ve had interesting but not entirely unbelievable versions of werewolves, vampires, ghosts, and fae–all with a distinctly Old World influence on them. This time around though, we finally dig a bit into Mercy’s father’s family and get a big nasty beastie from the Americas.

On one hand, it’s nice to get a bigger world to interact with. I’ve read fewer books than I’d like dealing with non-European myths and legends, so it’s a good thing to scratch that particular itch. On the other hand, the way it’s introduced in this story makes for a rather abrupt ‘power level’ jump. We’ve already seen centuries (millennia?) old vampires and (possibly) wolves and the Gray Lords are nothing to sneeze at, but this is perhaps the first time that literal gods takes the stage .

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Silver Borne (Mercy Thompson #5)

No more vampires, which is a plus for me at least. Your milage may vary. Instead we get a mix of wolves and Fae, which in my opinion are the best parts of the Mercyverse worldbuilding.

The subplot with Samuel is interesting. One thing that many urban fantasies tend to sweep under the rug is exactly how hard it could be to live for century after century. Many will pay lip service to it, mentioning it from time to time, but the characters often still feel relatively young. Samuel has some of that as well, but there are at least hints of of it here that he is really an old wolf.

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Bone Crossed (Mercy Thompson #4)

Back to vampires for a little while.

Remember back when Mercy pissed off the local vampire leadership? Well now she’s run out of town… and of course bumps into more vampires. One thing leads to another… vampires die… and Mercy saves the day.

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