Advent of Code 2018

Let’s do it again! I’m starting a day late, but much better than last year 😄!

This time around, I’m hoping to solve each problem in both Python and Racket, both to show an example of how the languages differ and … well, because I can 😇.

EDIT 2018-12-05: Yeah… I’m not actually going to do these in both Racket and Python. The solutions are ending up being near direct translations. Since there are probably fewer people solving these in Racket, I’ll do that first and Python eventually™.

As always, these problems are wonderful to try to solve yourself. If you agree, stop reading now. This post isn’t going anywhere.

If you’d like to see the full form of any particular solution, you can do so on GitHub (including previous years and possibly some I haven’t written up yet): jpverkamp/advent-of-code


Advent of Code 2017

As I did with last year / yesterday, I’ve written up a series of posts for the Advent of Code 2017 problems. Again, I didn’t manage to write them up as I did them, but this time around I least I finished mostly on time.


Advent of Code 2016

As I did last year, I’m going to solve the Advent of Code problems again this year.

Or that was the plan. It turns out that instead I put down my blog for almost a year and a half and never quite got around to doing these problems. So I’m actually backdating these posts from the early days of 2018 to where they would have been had I solved them on time. They’re still interesting problems, so give them a read.


AoC 2017 Day 25: Turing

Source: The Halting Problem

Part 1: Implement a Turing machine defined as such:

Begin in state A.
Perform a diagnostic checksum after 6 steps.

In state A:
  If the current value is 0:
    - Write the value 1.
    - Move one slot to the right.
    - Continue with state B.
  If the current value is 1:
    - Write the value 0.
    - Move one slot to the left.
    - Continue with state B.

...

What is the final number of 1s on the tape?


AoC 2017 Day 24: Maker Of Bridges

Source: Electromagnetic Moat

Part 1: Given a series of reversible components of the form 3/4 (can connect a 3 on one end to a 4 on the other), form a bridge of components. The bridge’s strength is equal to the sum of component values. So 0/3, 3/7, and 7/4 has a strength of 0+3 + 3+7 + 7+4 = 24.

What is the strongest possible bridge?