Wintersmith

The trouble is you can shut your eyes but you can’t shut your mind.

Tiffany returns, this time slightly older and in just a bit more trouble than before. This time around, she accidentally danced with the Wintersmith (the very embodiment of winter) and, as one thing leads to another, the Wintersmith beings to fall in love, trying to become human along the way.

Iron enough to make a nail > Lime enough to paint a wall > Water enough to drown a dog > Sulphur enough to stop the fleas > Potash enough to wash a shirt > Gold enough to buy a bean > Silver enough to coat a pin > Lead enough to blast a bird > Phosphor enough to light the town > Strength enough to build a home > Time enough to hold a child > Love enough to break a heart

Perhaps the best part of the book is how Tiffany owns up to what she’s done and does her best to put everything back together. There are some wonderful scenes with the main Witches from other Discworld books (Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg in particular), but the focus remains on Tiffany.

As with the other Tiffany Aching books, it’s a wonderful Discworld’y with a fairy tale feel. Well worth the read. Honestly, I liked this one more than A Hat Full of Stars, possibly even more than the Wee Free Men–although of course you’d want to start there when first reading the series.

Well worth the read once again.

Finally, because one must:

Because no man wants to be a coward in front of a cheese.

What? It makes sense in context.

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